Success Stories

Pallid Sturgeon are one of the many species benefitting from aquatic habitat restoration projects

Pallid Sturgeon are one of the many species benefitting from aquatic habitat restoration projects. Photo by Paul Hartfield.

Restoration of Aquatic Habitat

To date, we have:

  • 23 completed river restoration projects
  • Restored flows to over 82 miles of river side channels
  • 1 lake restoration project

The Restoring America’s Greatest River initiative is our signature program. In the early 2000s, through the Mississippi River Conservation Initiative, we worked with stakeholders from the six lower Mississippi River states to identify more than 200 aquatic habitat restoration and river-access improvement projects.

Read the fact sheet (PDF, 3.2 MB) or view the project area map (PDF).

The projects benefit protected species such as the Pallid Sturgeon, Interior Least Tern and Fat Pocketbook mussel. Dozens of other species benefit, too. More projects are planned with our partners, including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others.

The USDA’s Rachel Stout Evans tests soil at a reforestation site in Bolivar County, Miss

The USDA’s Rachel Stout Evans tests soil at a reforestation site in Bolivar County, Miss. Photo by Bruce Reid.

Reforestation of Frequently Flooded Land

  • More than 10,000 acres enrolled or accepted for enrollment thus far.

In 2012, we began working with the nonprofit Mississippi River Trust to reforest frequently flooded cleared land within the Lower Mississippi River floodplain in six states.  Willing landowners enter their land in conservation easements and  receive financial and technical assistance with restoring the land to bottomland hardwood forest.

Reforestation of these “batture” lands will help:

  • Lessen the amount of excess nutrients entering the river and the Gulf of Mexico
  • Reduce flooding of farmland
  • Reduce federal crop insurance payments
  • Increase opportunities for outdoor recreation
  • Expand habitat for bears, migratory birds and other wildlife

Funding is provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, along with the Walton Family Foundation and the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities.

Biking is increasing in popularity along the Lower Mississippi River

Biking is increasing in popularity along the Lower Mississippi River. Photo by Paul Ingram.

Comprehensive Natural Resources Study

The LMRCC is a primary partner in the Lower Mississippi River Resource Assessment, the region’s first comprehensive natural resources study in decades.  The assessment covers information needs, habitat needs, recreation and access needs.

A report to Congress will recommend a variety of projects to improve management of the Lower Mississippi River.

Partners include the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers districts in Memphis, Vicksburg and New Orleans, along with The Nature Conservancy, National Audubon Society, Mississippi River Corridor-Tennessee, Wildlife Mississippi, Delta Wildlife and Quapaw Canoe Company.

Online Fishing Guide

In 2012, we completed a guide to Fishing the Lower Mississippi River.  The guide is free for download and is designed to show anglers how and where to fish on the lower river, and provide them information on safety, access, and regulations.

The guide will be updated and improved over time.  We are committed to improving habitat for fish and wildlife, in addition to providing information on how to enjoy America’s Greatest River.

  • Download the fishing guide (PDF, 7 MB)
  • Download the Flash version of the fishing guide (for laptops, desktop, or mobile devices)

Lower Mississippi River Economic Profile

The Lower Mississippi River and its associated natural resources support a diverse and productive regional economy, according to a new profile produced for the Lower Mississippi River Conservation Committee. In their research, economists sought to document the economic values derived from or associated with the Lower Mississippi River and its abundant water, extensive forests, rich soil, diverse fish and wildlife, and other resources. Learn more about the LMR Economic Profile.